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13 August 2006 @ 06:30 am
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The year 1830.

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Fortune depends on the tone of your voicebopeepsheep on August 13th, 2006 01:49 pm (UTC)
1830's the year Emily Dickinson was born.
Fortune depends on the tone of your voicebopeepsheep on August 13th, 2006 01:52 pm (UTC)
Wikipedia says that American poetry is essentially divided into that which descends from the work of Walt Whitman, and that which descends from Dickinson. I'm going to go and read some of her poems (I know a couple offhand but it's not an area I spent much time studying) and see where that takes me.
Jenniferjunipertree on August 14th, 2006 02:46 pm (UTC)
1830 was also the year Christina Georgina Rossetti was born. Not as influential as Emily Dickinson, but another poet.
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 01:57 pm (UTC)
fashion
http://www.operagloves.com/Fashion/RegencyFashion/regency2.html
Three pictures are labeled from the year. I love how they have slouchy shoulders!
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 02:01 pm (UTC)
Bonnets
http://www.vintagefashionguild.org/hatshistory.html

"By 1830 bonnets grew to huge proportions. A large brim framed the wearer's face from the front but hid her profile from the side. A veil protected her identity and propriety as well as her delicate skin from the sun's rays."

Further down on the page is a bonnet resembling the description.
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 02:09 pm (UTC)
Riding Habits
http://users.tinyworld.co.uk/sidesaddlelady/Museum%20-%20riding%20habits.html

"By the 1830s, the large, dropped-shoulder 'gigot' sleeves were popular. These were fairly short-lived, but the bulbous skirts remained throughout the mid-nineteenth century, accompanied by jackets with large peplums."

The triangular look to the torso area on women because of the dropped sleeves is facinating.
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 02:26 pm (UTC)
More fashion
http://demode.tweedlebop.com/realvict/1800s.html

This link has links to pictures of various museum pieces of clothing. If the sleeves weren't very popular for long, I blame this. http://www.kci.or.jp/cgi-bin/collection.cgi?lang=e&path=1820/09-009455_a
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 02:29 pm (UTC)
Coins
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 02:31 pm (UTC)
Guitars
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 02:41 pm (UTC)
Comic-like drawings
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 06:52 pm (UTC)
Chinese ceramics
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 06:55 pm (UTC)
Chinese chess set
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 06:57 pm (UTC)
Chinese boxes sewing
MagicPointeShoesmagicpointeshoe on August 13th, 2006 07:01 pm (UTC)
Chinese pocket watch ceramic art
Jenniferjunipertree on August 14th, 2006 02:45 pm (UTC)
The Frugal Housewife
I found this cookbook, printed in 1830. I thought it was neat and I'm bookmarking to read later.

http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/html/books/book_06.cfm
Jenniferjunipertree on August 14th, 2006 02:48 pm (UTC)
Cooking
A corn bread recipe from 1830: original and modernized.

http://www.aliceross.com/recipes.htm
Talitaliface on August 14th, 2006 03:09 pm (UTC)
1830 was the year of the passage of the Indian Removal Act (which passed in Congress by only one vote). The best known ramification of this act was the forced removal of the Cherokee peoples in the year 1838, in what came to be known as the Trail of tears. Other results (such as the marginalization of native americans by american culture as a whole) can still be seen today.